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Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen

Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen

Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen

Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen

Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen
Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen
Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance - Bake with Yen
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Bake With Yen – Five Traditional Chinese New Year Snacks and Their Significance

It’s only been weeks since we entered a new decade, and now we find ourselves preparing for another celebration. With lanterns and fireworks all over the place, it’s officially the season of the New Lunar Year!

Everyone seems to be gearing up for the occasion, from spring cleaning to filling up ang baos; speaking of preparations, no Chinese New Year (CNY) festivities would be complete without serving auspicious snacks.

Like your traditional CNY dishes, the goodies we enjoy while chatting with our relatives also hold a strong significance. In this article, we reveal five of the most interesting stories behind our favourite New Year snacks:

1. Rolled Pineapple Tart

A classic festive treat, this pineapple jam-filled rich butter pastry is a must-have in every CNY banquet. Known as “Ong Lai” in the Hokkien dialect, which directly translates to “fortune, come”, pineapples are believed to bring prosperity and good luck to those who eat it.

 

2. Kuih Bahulu

Kuih Bahulu is usually referred to as the Nyonya version of madeleines. It is either shaped as a scallop, a cermai fruit, or a fish which represents abundance. In the past, these miniature traditional cakes were hard to cook over hot charcoal, so since then, it has been regarded as a precious snack for CNY.

3. Traditional Groundnut Cookies

Pronounced as “hua sheng” in Mandarin which sounds like the Chinese word for “life”, groundnuts are believed to symbolize longevity and health. Serving this in your home during CNY means wishing your guests a vigorous life.

 

4. Fried Sesame Balls

Crunchy on the outside and chewy on the inside, this glutinous rice ball with red bean filling is a popular Chinese New Year snack full of significance and meaning. Its round shape and golden brown colour is thought to represent luck, while the way it increases its size when fried is thought to symbolize growth.

5. German Cookies

Contrary to what its name suggests, these melt-in-the mouth treats did not originate from Germany. Tracing its roots from Malaysia, German Cookies are moulded by rolling in between the palms of the hand so that it takes a round shape, which is a Chinese symbol for reunion, perfection and unity.

Feel lucky with your family all year round with these tasty morsels of fun!

Can’t find the time to buy your ingredients? Shop for your baking needs online at bakewithyen.sg/shop!

Your favourite supplier of quality baking products now delivers island-wide! From ingredients to bakeware to baking tools, Bake With Yen has got you covered! We present a wide range of products at reasonably affordable prices and even offer free delivery for orders above $150.

Place your orders now at bakewithyen.sg/shop or drop by our store near you:

 

📍 34 Joo Chiat Rd, Singapore 427364

🕘 9am – 7pm daily (Closed on PH)

☎ 6242 8017

 

📍 5 Tampines Street 32, #01-11/12, Singapore 529284 (Tampines Mart)

🕘 10am – 7pm daily (Closed on PH)

☎ 6904 8670

 

📍 Blk 162 Bukit Merah Central, #01-3541, Singapore 150162

🕘 10am – 8pm daily (Closed on PH)

☎ 6908 4095

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